Vaccine Information

In order to comply with state regulations, registration for all COVID -19 vaccine appointments must be done through internet-based CDMS.  Follow the instructions exactly. Check back regularly for scheduled clinics.

 

VACCINE CLINICS: Please follow the instructions exactly and check back regularly for more scheduled clinics. Thank you for your patience and understanding.

Please take a few minutes to listen to our President and CEO explain how the vaccine supply chain works.

Joe Ruffolo, President and CEO Niagara Falls Memorial Medical Center

CLINIC 1:  FULL Monday, January 25 THIS DATE IS NOW FULL

CLINIC 2: FULL Wednesday, January 27 THIS DATE IS NOW FULL

We will announce new clinics as soon as we have more vaccines to administrate. Thank you ALL for your understanding! 

Niagara Falls Memorial Medical Center will dispense the COVID-19 vaccine to those in Phase 1a and 1b. See the list below

Under New York’s expanded eligibility, the list of individuals below will now be eligible to schedule a COVID-19 vaccine appointment.

  • Eligible New Yorkers in Phase 1a are:
    • High-risk hospital workers (emergency room workers, ICU staff and Pulmonary Department staff)
    • Residents and staff at nursing homes and other congregate care facilities
    • Federally Qualified Health Center employees
    • EMS workers
    • Coroners, medical examiners and certain funeral workers
    • Staff and residents at OPWDD, OMH and OASAS facilities
    • Urgent Care providers
    • Individuals administering COVID-19 vaccines, including local health department staff
    • All Outpatient/Ambulatory front-line, high-risk health care workers of any age who provide direct in-person patient care
    • All staff who are in direct contact with patients (i.e., intake staff)
    • All front-line, high-risk public health workers who have direct contact with patients, including those conducting COVID-19 tests, handling COVID-19 specimens and COVID-19 vaccinations
    • This includes, but is not limited to,
      • Doctors who work in private medical practices and their staff
      • Doctors who work in hospital-affiliated medical practices and their staff
      • Doctors who work in public health clinics and their staff
      • Registered Nurses
      • Specialty medical practices of all types
      • Dentists and Orthodontists and their staff
      • Psychiatrists and Psychologists and their staff
      • Physical Therapists and their staff
      • Optometrists and their staff
      • Pharmacists and Pharmacy Aides
      • Home care workers
      • Hospice workers
    • Staff of nursing homes/skilled nursing facilities who did not receive COVID vaccination through the Pharmacy Partnership for Long-Term Care Program
  • Eligible New Yorkers in Phase 1b are:
    • Individuals Age 65 and older
    • First Responder and Support Staff for First Responder Agencies
      • Fire Service
        • State Fire Service, including firefighters and investigators (professional and volunteer)
        • Local Fire Services, including firefighters and investigators (professional and volunteer)
      • Police and Investigators
        • State Police, including Troopers
        • State Park Police, DEC Police, Forest Rangers
        • SUNY Police
        • Sheriffs’ Offices
        • County Police Departments and Police Districts
        • City, Town, and Village Police Departments
        • Transit of other Public Authority Police Departments
        • State Field Investigators, including Department of Motor Vehicles, State Commission of Correction, Justice Center, Department of Financial Services, Inspector General, Department of Tax and Finance, Office of Children and Family Services, and State Liquor Authority
      • Public Safety Communications
        • Emergency Communication and Public Safety Answering Point Personnel, including dispatchers and technicians
      • Other Sworn and Civilian Personnel
        • Court Officers
        • Other Police or Peace Officers
        • Support or Civilian Staff for Any of the above services, agencies, or facilities
    • Corrections
      • State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision Personnel, including correction and parole officers
      • Local Correctional Facilities, including correction officers
      • Local Probation Departments, including probation officers
      • State Juvenile Detention and Rehabilitation Facilities
      • Local Juvenile Detention and Rehabilitation Facilities
    • In-person college instructors
    • P-12 Schools
      • P-12 school or school district faculty or staff (includes all teachers, substitute teachers, student teachers, school administrators, paraprofessional staff and support staff including bus drivers)
      • Contractors working in a P-12 school or school district (including contracted bus drivers)
    • Licensed, registered, approved or legally exempt group Childcare Providers
    • Employees or Support Staff of Licensed or Registered Childcare Setting
    • Grocery store workers
    • Public Transit
      • Airline and airport employees
      • Passenger railroad employees
      • Subway and mass transit employees (i.e., MTA, LIRR, Metro North, NYC Transit, Upstate transit)
      • Ferry employees
      • Port Authority employees
      • Public bus employees
    • Individuals living in a homeless shelter where sleeping, bathing or eating accommodations must be shared with individuals and families who are not part of the same household
    • Individual working (paid or unpaid) in a homeless shelter where sleeping, bathing or eating accommodations must be shared by individuals and families who are not part of the same household, in a position where there is potential for interaction with shelter residents
    • Cancer (current or in remission, including 9/11-related cancers)
    • Chronic kidney disease
    • Pulmonary disease, including but not limited to COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), asthma (moderate-to-severe), pulmonary fibrosis, cystic fibrosis and 9/11-related pulmonary diseases
    • Intellectual and developmental disabilities including Down syndrome
    • Heart conditions, including but not limited to heart failure, coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathies or hypertension (high blood pressure)
    • Immunocompromised state (weakened immune system), including but not limited to solid organ transplant or from blood or bone marrow transplant, immune deficiencies, HIV, use of corticosteroids, use of other immune weakening medicines or other causes
    • Severe obesity (body mass index of 40 kg/m2 or higher), obesity (body mass index of between 30 kg/m2 and 40 kg/m2)
    • Pregnancy
    • Sickle cell disease or thalassemia
    • Type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus
    • Cerebrovascular disease (affects blood vessels and blood supply to the brain)
    • Neurologic conditions including but not limited to Alzheimer’s disease or dementia
    • Liver disease

Frequently Asked Questions About The COVID-19 Vaccine

Is there COVID virus in the vaccine?

No, this is not a live virus. The vaccine has been developed to give instructions for our cells to make a harmless piece of a spike protein similar to what is on the surface of the virus.  Once the protein is made by our cells, we get rid of the “instructions” from the vaccine and then our immune system builds natural antibodies, thus giving us some protection.

What are the most common adverse reactions seen here at NFMMC?

Based on feedback from employees that have had the vaccine here at NFMMC, we are seeing mainly a sore arm for about 24 hrs.  Some have also said they had a mild headache and felt tired.  On a smaller scale, staff have said they had a low fever and were a little nauseous.  Overall, there have not been any serious reactions here.  Most staff have said it wasn’t nearly as bad as they thought and were generally pleased with the process and how quickly and painless the actual shot was.  We hope to continue this trend!  

What if I’ve had COVID previously?

You may have developed some protection through antibodies, but the level of protection isn’t well known at this time.  It is recommended to still receive the vaccine as long as you are outside of the quarantine period, asymptomatic, and not showing signs of active disease (all typically after 10 days from the start of symptoms)

Patients who have received monoclonal antibody treatment should wait 90 days before receiving the vaccine.

If I get COVID after receiving the first vaccine dose, what does that mean?

The active disease is not related to the vaccine itself, as it does not contain a live virus.  You may have already been infected, just without symptoms, and then started to show symptoms after the vaccine.  Also, protection from the vaccine is not immediate.

When will the vaccine start to work?

In the Pfizer vaccine studies, protection was seen starting around day 12 after the first shot, providing about 52% effectiveness.  Around 7 days after the second dose, this went up to 95%.

Similar results were seen with the Moderna vaccine.

Do I still need to wear a mask, social distance, etc.?

Yes, proper precautions should still be in place, as the best prevention is a combination of the vaccine and continuation of these guidelines.  As stated above, protection also is not immediate.  

Can I spread COVID even after getting the vaccine?

The vaccine may protect you from getting serious symptoms or general illness, but you can still potentially be a carrier of the virus and contagious to others.

Will the vaccine interfere with a COVID test?

No, the vaccine will not cause a positive PCR or antigen test.